Tag Archives: English Post

The Toyota flow system

The Toyota Flow System (TFS, developed by Nigel Thurlow, Professor John Turner, and Brian Rivera, 2019can be described as a system of patterns, practices and techniques to enable organizations and institutions to achieve desired outcomes in a complex world. This model uses the popular representation of a house, from the Toyota Production System model (TPS), to outline an evidence-based approach to achieving business transformation.

The TFS is a system of understanding, and not a one-size-fits-all framework. The TFS model aims to sustain the flow of value to the customer, who is the center of the TFS universe.

As we dig deeper into the helixes, we find the philosophies, tools and knowledge (practice and theory) behind each component.  For Distributed Leadership, leadership is viewed as being bottom-up, top-down, as well as horizontal. Complexity Thinking involves identifying the level of complexity that is present in a problem or environment and calls for viewing systems as open and complex adaptive systems (CAS). Finally, Team Science utilizes empirical research to incorporate teamwork into current practices rather than operating as command-and-control groups with no teamwork present.

Toyota-Flow-System

For more information have a look at: Introducing the Toyota flow system 

In my Bird’s eye view on the agile forest, I positioned this approach in the block business as usual / indefinite. For more information on this picture see: A bird’s eye view on the agile forest 

Grasp session (Scaling Agile, 190702) v1.1

PMO of the world award 2019

The PMO Global Awards is the PMO Global Alliance’s annual award for the most outstanding Project Management Offices in the world.

This non-profit initiative intends to inspire organizations around the world to evolve their Project Management Offices and project management practices to achieve the best results.

It encourages organizations from all over the world to share knowledge and experiences, acknowledging best results, and allowing the evolution of the PMO worldwide community.

The PMO Global Awards have PMOs from 64 countries on five continents, recognizing and encouraging organizations around the world to achieve better results.

The whole evaluation process is online. The four finalists, representing their regions (Africa, Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe) will be honored at the awards ceremony when the PMO of 2019 is announced.

worldmap (HP locations PMO global 2019)

Being one of the global judges, I had the chance to participate in four rounds (including the final round). This gave me the opportunity to have a look at nine different PMO’s across the globe (including PMO’s from Peru, Brazil, United Kingdom, Poland, Slovenia, Turkey, Bahrein, Angola and Australia). The PMO Global Awards 2019 will take place on Thursday 17th October 2019 at FuturePMO in London.

Mini webinar PRINCE2 Agile Agilometer

webinarOn request of several of my followers I created a mini webinar of the PRINCE2 Agile Agilometer. According to the official PRINCE2 Agile manual, the Agilometer is a tool that assesses the level of risk associated with using agile in combination with PRINCE2. This allows PRINCE2 to be tailored in such a way that best mitigated the level of risk. The Agilometer should evolve to suit the needs of each organization.

In this approximately 10 minutes mini webinar I discuss the composition of PRINCE2 Agile before I go into the Agilometer slider details and the relationship with the management layers of PRINCE2.

Review AGILE NXT – New Insights for Agile Performance Management

Schermafbeelding 2019-06-18 om 13.27.07This is XEBIA’s second edition of AGILE NXT (see AGILE NXT for the first edition). This time you get approximately twenty articles to bring you up to speed with new insights for agile performance management.

  • Measuring the Value of Business Agility (by Daria Nozhkina) shows that business agility generally adds value in three ways: it impacts the top line or the costs (or both); drives profitability; and contributes soft value which ensures that the profitability achieved is sustainable over the long term.
  • Data Science and Coaching: The Yin/Yang of Better Interventions (by Pieter Rijken) gives insights in team behavioral change by looking at goodness for fit for the delivery rate (items per iteration) data.
  • The Efficiency Addiction: Just Say No (by Roel trienekens). If you focus on efficiency … you get better at being increasingly less effective. Efficiency is about doing the same for less, effectiveness is about achieving more with the same input.
  • Four Steps to Effective Performance Meetings (by Daniel Burm) discusses four fundamental principles to keep in mind for people leading performance meetings: it’s not about you, close the loop, achievable next steps, and ask open questions.
  • The Quantifiable Added Value of Scrum is an interview with Jeff Sutherland about result-oriented organizations operating on clear and simple performance indicators (by Serge Beaumont).
  • Diamond Agile: Measuring What’s Meaningful (by Frank Verbruggen). Diamond Agile is a way of looking at organizational health from 5 different perspectives. Associated with each perspective are metrics. These metrics have been selected from hundreds of metrics as the best fit. 
  • The Power of Play in a Safe (But Not Too Safe) Environment (by Jasper Lamers) shows that a safe environment in which people can experiment, learn and fail without ruining the company, boost creativity.
  • Measuring Success, Measuring Value: Performance Management in a Scrum World (by Gunther Verheyen) highlights that team engagement is the most ignored aspect of value, yet one where huge gain can be made to increase the ability to deliver value.
  • The Gentle Way of Change (by Chris Lukassen) talks about six levers or sources of influence from the path to Judo black belt that could make you a better leader in business: personal motivation, personal ability, social motivation, social ability, structural motivation, and structural ability.
  • Changing Behavior—Measure First, Change Next (by Just Meddens) emphasizes what it does take to actually change behavior in the long term, and why it is so important in business. To change behavior the ABC change model can be of help (Antecedent: what triggers the behavior? Behavior: what’s being displayed? Consequence: what happens after the behavior is displayed? Is it being reinforced?).
  • It Takes Two to Do the Agile Tango: Invite Security to the Dancefloor (by Dave van Stein). Security and development need to dance together, so it’s best if they both learn the steps together, right from the beginning of your agile transition. Otherwise, once the development teams gain velocity, security and incident management becomes an impediment, and there is likely to be a few stumbles on the dancefloor.
  • Micro-Interventions from a Position of Leadership (by Rik de Groot). Management is responsible for 33% of transition failures. Micro-interventions that can help to achieve a positive outcome are provide purpose, speak out and build trust, lead by example, think big, act small, and shared leadership.
  • Doing: Diagnosis and Intervention Guide (by Paul Immerzeel and Maarten Uppelschoten) gives insights in the Doing model. Why people do things, how intervention triggers the behavior that creates the desired outcome and with it, organizational change. Forces that influence doing are understanding, willing, able and being enabled.
  • The Secret Key to Performance: Inner Agility (by Mirjam Diependaal). When in transition, organizations often forget that the essential factor in change is people. And people are often afraid to change. That’s why organizations should explicitly focus on helping people develop inner agility, because, without it, lasting change won’t occur.
  • Reducing Waste in the Race for Innovation (by Wilco Nap) outlines strategies designed to prevent product waste, time waste, and talent waste.
  • EventStorming: Increasing Performance Through Continuous Discovery, Learning, and Sharing (by Kenny Baas-Schwegler) explains EventStorming. It’s a workshop-based method for facilitating collaboration between the different IT disciplines and silos to empower knowledge-sharing.
  • Metrics: WiFi, Hamburgers, and the Successful Improvement Rate (by Jarl Meijer) emphasizes that there are two metrics that matter most in measuring the success of an agile transformation: the “level of agility” and the” successful improvement rate”.
  • How DevOps Helps You Accelerate Your Execution Power and Why it Matters (by Hans-Jürgen Jacobs and Pavel Goultiaev). DevOps allows a company to respond faster and rapidly test assumptions in any response to opportunities or threats. By creating more customer value, a company can achieve superior performance.

Curious to read the magazine? Download or request a printed copy at: AGILE NXT

 

130 top project management influencers 2019

top-rated-badge-project-management-influencerHappy to find my name on a list of 130 Top Project Management Influencers of 2019 (not in the top, but in the list) by the Digital Project Manager.

Have a look at 130 top project management influencers 2019

Review Flawless consulting

flawless consulting 9780470620748-480x600Peter Block is the author of Flawless consulting – A guide to getting your expertise used. Starting point are the following three consulting goals. Establish a collaborative relationship. Solve problems so they stay solved and ensure attention is given to both the technical/ business problem and the relationships. To achieve this, you have to follow four phases and you must make sure you complete the requirements for each phase before you move into the next phase.

The four phases and their requirements are:

  • Negotiate the client and your own wants, cope with mixed motivation, surface concerns about exposure and loss of control, and understand triangular and rectangular contracts.
  • Discovery and inquiry. Layers of inquiry, political climate, resistance to sharing information, and the interview as a joint learning event.
  • Feedback and decision to act. Funneling data, presenting personal and organizational data, managing the meeting for action, focusing on the here and now, and don’t take it personally.
  • Engagement and implementation. Bet on engagement over mandate and persuasion, design more participation than presentation, encourage difficult public exchanges, put real choice on the table, change the conversation to change the culture, and pay attention to place.

Result By definition, being a consultant – and not a manager – means you have direct control and responsibility only for your own time and your own support resources. The line manager is paid to take responsibility for what the line organization implements or doesn’t implement!

Accountability If I – know my area of expertise (a given), behave authentically with the client, tend to and complete the business of each consulting phase, and act to build capacity for the client to solve the next problem on their own, I can legitimately say I have consulted flawlessly.

QRC (Flawless consulting, 190628) v1.0To download: QRC (Flawless consulting, 190628) v1.0

The book explains what to do during the different phases, what kind of meetings can be or must be held (including checklists). You get practical guidance on how to ask better questions, gives suggestions for dealing with difficult clients, and contains expanded guidelines on more engaging forms of implementation. It describes the important differences between internal and external consultants. What kind of resistance can you face, what does it mean and how to deal with resistance? Several examples are given including two outside the consultancy world. One taken from the health care and one from educational reform efforts.

In the book you can find several handy checklists:

  • Assessing the balance of responsibility: Rate who is taking responsibility in a project you are engaged in.
  • Analyzing one of Your contracts: Practice writing up elements of your contract.
  • Planning a contracting meeting: Answer these questions when you are planning a contracting meeting.
  • Reviewing the contracting meeting: Questions to answer after the meeting.
  • Planning a discovery meeting: Planning guidelines to aid in data collection and prepare for resistance.
  • Reviewing the discovery meeting: Questions to answer after the meeting.
  • Planning a meeting for action: Guidelines to help you prepare for the meeting.
  • Reviewing the meeting for action: Questions to answer after the meeting.
  • Preparing for implementation: Reminders on working the elements of engagement into the implementation phase.
  • Reviewing an implementation event: Questions to answer after the Implementation phase.

To download these checklists, visit www.flawlessconsulting.com where you can find much more resources too.

Conclusion. A must read for consultants. If you just start or if you are already a very experienced consultant, this book gives a lot a very useful insights, practices, checklists, examples, and a way of thinking and working to build the right relationship with your client and to avoid disappointments on the client’s or your own side.

To order (Managementboek): Flawless Consulting

To order (Bol.com): Flawless consulting

Bimodal Portfolio Management

Introduction

1*ORjFcvHHbyWBTA1WIijXYwAt the moment, many organizations are in the middle, or on the brink of, a radical change to more business agility. I receive quite often the question how to cope with both an agile portfolio as well as a more traditional portfolio with temporary projects and programs. Existing frameworks supports either an agile IT portfolio or a more traditional portfolio, but I haven’t seen frameworks which supports both.

If I look at existing traditional and agile IT portfolio management frameworks, I asked myself if combining these frameworks can bring an answer for those organizations who need to manage an agile as well as a more traditional portfolio?

In this article I will start with a brief explanation of the existing portfolio management frameworks by explaining the principles and the process (Management of Portfolios, Standard for Portfolio Management, Disciplined Agile Portfolio Management, Agile Portfolio Management, Evidence-Based Portfolio Management, and SAFe Lean Portfolio Management).

MoP P3O SAFe Hybrid (190621) v0.1In the second part of this article I focus on Bimodal Portfolio Management where I combine the best of these worlds and offer a solution for both worlds in the form of a Bimodal Portfolio Kanban (see figure), Bimodal Portfolio Management Principles and Bimodal Portfolio Roadmaps.

To download the article: Bimodal Portfolio Management (article, 190626) v1.0