Tag Archives: English Post

P3M3 Maturity Model Assessment

A few years ago I created a P3M3 Quick Reference Card. See P3M3 QRC.

P3M3_Digital-Badge-352x352As a consequence of receiving the P3M3 Assessor badge from AXELOS after I passed for the P3M3 Consultant examination, I had to update my P3M3 QRC to correspond with the latest P3M3 version.

At this moment AXELOS offers P3M3 version 3.  This model is based on the five known maturity levels: Level 1 : Awareness of process, Level 2 : Repeatable process, Level 3 : Defined process, Level 4 : Managed process, Level 5 : Optimized process.

In P3M3 version 3 we see the three models reflecting portfolio (PfM3), Programme (PgM3) and Project (PjM3) Management. We still see the same seven perspectives: Management Control, Benefits Management, Financial Management, Stakeholder Management, Risk Management, Organizational Governance and Resource Management. P3M3 can be used independently of your chosen project, programme or portfolio management method or framework.

P3M3 V3 (QRC, 171205) v1.0

To download: P3M3 V3 (QRC, 171205) v1.0

New are the max. 13 threads: Asset Management, Assurance, Behaviors, Commercial Commissioner, Commercial Deliverer, Information and Knowledge Management, Infrastructure and Tools, Model Integration, Organization, Planning, Process, Standards and Techniques. The most detailed questions are now the diagnostic attribute statements.

You can perform, by yourself, a Standard self assessment (for free) or Enhanced self assessment (subscription). The latter offers you on top of the standard self assessment a maturity tracker, detailed results and a benchmark.

It is also possible, via an accredited consulting organization to perform a full accreditation assessment resulting in your maturity level based on P3M3 or a full further diagnostic assessment including an improvement plan to achieve the next maturity level.

HWP Consulting, as an Accredited P3M3 Consulting Organization can help you in performing a P3M3 full accreditation assessment or full further diagnostic assessment including an improvement plan based on your own objectives. To avoid bias we can facilitate your self assessment as well.

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Global standards and publications Edition 2018/2019

2017_GSAP-180x150Van Haren Publishing send me their latest Global standards and publications Edition 2018/2019.

A handsome guide containing short summaries (3 minutes) of many standards including the Van Haren publishing portfolio.

I am one of the authors of a couple of these summaries.

In this guide, you can find:

  • 20 standards in the field from IT & IT Management: Agile, Scrum, Devops, ASL, CMMi, COBIT, e-CF, ISO/IEC20000, ISO/IEC27000, ISO38500, ISM, ITIL, Lean IT, AIM, BRM, IT-CMF, SFIA, SAF, TRIM, VeriSM)
  • 12 standards in the field of Project Management: Axelos family (PRINCE2 2017, MSP, MoP, P3O, P3M3, M_o_R, MoV), ICB4, PMBoK, ISO21500, ISO3100, Praxis
  • 3 standards in the field of Enterprise architecture: ArchiMate, IT4IT, TOGAF
  • 9 standards in the field of Business Management: Balanced scorecard, BiSL, BiSL Next, eSCM-CL/SP, OPBoK, Operating Model Canvas, Six Sigma, SqEME

If I compare this guide with the Edition 2016/2017 we see the following additions:

IT & IT Management:

  • ISM: IT Service Management
  • SAF: Service Automation Framework
  • TRIM: The Rational IT Model
  • VeriSM: Value-driven Evolving Responsive Integrated Service Management

Project Management:

  • Praxis: The free framework for project, programme and portfolio management

Business Management

  • BiSL Next: includes Business Information Management (BIM)
  • Operating Model Canvas: aligning operations and organization with strategy

Bestellen: Global standards and publications Edition 2018/2019

2017 Scrum guide revision

Schermafdruk 2017-11-08 10.03.18Yesterday (November 7) Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland presented the Scrum Guide revision.
They started with a brief history of Scrum and explained the essence of Scrum followed by the main part of this webinar. The Scrum Guide 2017 is updated on responses to input from Scrum users.
The following topics were discussed:
  • Uses of Scrum (beyond IT)
  • Refined the role of the Scrum Master (promoting and supporting Scrum by helping everyone understand Scrum theory, practices, rules, and values, within the culture of the organization)
  • Daily Scrum is for inspection and adaption to ensure progress towards the sprint goal (how can we move the backlog to done?)
  • Time-boxes cary a maximum length (the words “at most” are added)
  • Sprint Backlog includes feedback from the sprint retrospective. To ensure continuous improvement, the sprint backlog must contain at least one high priority process improvement identified in the previous retrospective meeting).
In the last part of the session some common misconceptions were addressed:
  • Is Scrum only relevant to software delivery? No
  • Can I release before the end of the sprint? Yes
  • What about DevOps? Already after the first sprints you have to prove the product is viable and will produce value. This asks for an operational environment.
To download the new Scrum guide: www.scrumguides.org
To watch the video of the Scrum Guide Revision Webinar: video of the Scrum Guide Revision Webinar, where you can download the used presentation too.

 

Sent from my iPad

If you need to structure, explain or summarize, use a canvas

images-2It all started with the success of the Business Model Canvas and due to that success, many more canvasses for different purposes were created. In several of my posts I showed one or more. It’s a perfect instrument to avoid bulky, inaccessible, standalone, and illegible documents. It’s also a tool that increases collaboration between all involved stakeholders and it will help to create buy-in.

On business level:

Business_Model_Canvas

The business model canvas

value proposition

The value proposition canvas

slide13

The operating model canvas

AcampbellImage3

Operational + value proposition + business model canvas:  The enhanced business model canvas

On portfolio level: The portfolio canvas

portfolio-canvas-en

On program level:  The program canvas

program_canvas_nieuw_2016

On project level: the Project canvas

img_1471

Kickoff canvas

ON_Kick-off_Canvas

On team level:  The team canvas

team-canvas-example-short

On change level: The change canvas

2017-01-17-10-27-48

Review: Manage your project portfolio

9781680501759-480x600Johanna Rothman wrote the book Manage your portfolio Second edition – Increase your capacity – Finish more projects. A book for the more professional portfolio manager or as mentioned on the back of the book: Expert skill level.

If you are facing too many projects, if firefighting and multitasking are keeping you from finishing any of them, this book will help you to manage your portfolio. It makes use of agile and lean ways of working and brings the biggest benefits when you are running your projects in an agile way too. Projects become to be delivered features and evaluation means prioritizing feature sets. In the quick reference card, I highlighted the way the author promotes the usage of Kanban boards to manage your portfolio and it visualizes some of the decisions to be taken.

Manage your portfolio (QRC, 171017) v1.0

To download: Manage your portfolio (QRC, 171017) v1.0

The author divided the book in fourteen chapters and these chapters gives you a step by step approach to build your portfolio. All chapters end with several situations and possible responses to try.

  1. Meet your project portfolio: It’s not your customer who cares about your portfolio. If you are facing issues to finish projects, if you want to deliver faster, more often and qualitative good products to your customer, you need a portfolio
  2. See your future: by managing your portfolio you make the organization’s choices transparent. It becomes clear what to work on first, second, third. It will help to avoid multitasking. What does it mean if you apply lean approaches to your project portfolio? You must think in terms of value, let teams work in small chunks that they can handle and complete
  3. Create the first draft of your portfolio: start collecting all the work before you attempt to evaluate and determine whether you need to do it now. When needed organize sets of projects into programs. Divide your projects in feature sets or Minimum Marketable Features. Not all feature sets are equally important.
  4. Evaluate your projects: the very first decision is about whether you want to commit to this project, kill the project, or transform the project in some way before continuing. If you don’t want to commit but you can’t kill it either put the project on a project parking lot (name, data, value discussion and notes) so you don’t lose track of it.
  5. Rank the portfolio: You can use many methods to rank. The author discusses the rank with Cost of Delay, business value points (divide a total number of points across your projects), by risk, organization’s context, by tour product’s position in the marketplace or by using pairwise comparison, single or double elimination.
  6. Collaborate on the portfolio: Making portfolio decisions is never a single person’s decision. Facilitate portfolio evaluation meetings.
  7. Iterate on the portfolio: Set an iteration length for your review cycles. This cycle length is affected by your project life cycle (agile delivery gives you the opportunity to have shorter review cycles), your product roadmap, and budgeting cycle.
  8. Make portfolio decisions: Conduct portfolio evaluation meetings at least quarterly to start with, decide how often to review the project parking lot. How are you going to cope with advanced R&D projects? Build a project portfolio Kanban (create backlog, evaluate, project work, assess/validate and maintain) to manage your portfolio.
  9. Visualize your project portfolio: Create a calendar view of your projects with predicted dates. Show not only your staffed projects but your unstaffed work too.
  10. Scaling portfolio management to an enterprise: What are the consequences of resource efficiency thinking (100% resource utilization is 0% flow)? How can you scale by starting bottom up or top down? You need both but scale with care. Do you know your enterprise’s mission or strategy otherwise it will be very difficult, if not impossible to make large decisions? Set up a corporate project portfolio meeting to answer the questions which projects help to implement our strategy and which project distract us from our strategy.
  11. Evolve your portfolio: Using lean can help you to evolve your portfolio approach. What does it mean if you stabilize the time-box or the number of work items in progress (see Naked planning video too).
  12. Measure the essentials: for a lean or agile approach consider the following measures: team’s velocity (current and historical), amount of work in progress (cycle and lead time, cumulative flow), obstacles preventing the team to move faster (how long in progress), product backlog burn-up chart, run rate. Never measure individual productivity.
  13. Define your mission: Brainstorm the essentials of a mission, refine the mission (specify strong verbs, eliminate adverbs, avoid jargon), iterate until you feel comfortable, test your mission, make the mission real for everyone.
  14. Start somewhere…but start!

Conclusion. Johanna Rothman wrote a must read for portfolio managers who are struggling with their role when their organization is moving towards more business agility, with more and more permanent agile teams in place but also for the traditional portfolio manager, facing too many projects and almost no delivery to get hands-on practical advice to start organizing their portfolios.

To order: Manage your portfolio Second edition – Increase your capacity – Finish more projects.

Naked Planning Overview by Arlo Belshee

Arlo was one of the first to lay-out the inspiration for Kanban systems for software development.

Review: The Scrum Culture

9783319118260-480x600The Scrum Culture – Introducing Agile Methods in Organizations by Dominik Maximini is a book that starts were most of the agile or Scrum books stop. You can send people to Scrum training classes but what does it mean if you want to use Scrum in your organization? The official Scrum guide is only sixteen pages, thus how difficult can it be? Is it that simple or are we talking about a transition of several years?

Probably the biggest root cause for failed agile transitions is the fact of misalignment between the needed agile mindset and the organizational culture.

The book is split in four parts. In the first, more theoretical, part the author evaluates different organizational culture models, explains his research and ends with a definition of the Scrum culture.

The following organization culture models are explained:

  • Harrison’s culture model (high/low formalization versus high/low centralization: role orientation, task/achievement orientation, person/support orientation, power orientation)
  • Deal and Kennedy’s culture model (fast/slow feedback versus high/low risk: work hard/play hard, tough guy/macho/stars, bet-your-company, process)
  • Schneider’s culture model (Actuality/possibility versus personal/impersonal: collaboration, control competence, cultivation)
  • Cameron and Quinn culture model (flexibility and discretion / stability and control versus internal focus and integration / external focus and differentiation: Clan (collaborate, adhocracy (create), market (compete), hierarchy (control))

The author compared traditional organizations and agile organizations (based on Gloger and Häusling) to highlight the cultural differences:

Traditional organization Agile organization
Position Role
Expert Generalist
Team lead Scrum Master (agile coach)
Product / Project Manager Product Manager / Product Owner
Responsibility of line management: Team, daily operation Responsibility of line management: Individual (focus intrinsic motivation), strategy
Passiveness Activeness
Planning of uncertainty over a long time horizon Planning for a short and clear time horizon
In-transparency Transparency
Presence Accomplishment
Customer as an alien Involvement of customers
Delegation of responsibility Adoption of responsibility
Control Self-responsibility – positive idea of man

A transition to a more agile organization will have an impact on the following categories: management and leadership, decision making, cadence and speed, planning, focus on productivity, soft factors, hierarchy and organization structure.

The second part is about the theory of introducing Scrum. The author discussed several shapes of Scrum, their advantages and disadvantages: Scrum PRN (pro re nata: take as much as needed), virtual Scrum software studio, Scrum software studio, façade Scrum, profound Scrum, and sustainable profound scrum.

Part III structures the way to introduce (your chosen shape of) Scrum. Will you use a bottom-up, a top-down or submarine approach?

The author uses Kotter’s eight steps for organizational change to explain what you must do to introduce and embed Scrum in your organization. In part IV we get a case study following the same eight steps.

Every step is explained in a separate chapter and you get explanations, pitfalls, do’s and don’ts. At the end of each chapter you get an overview with things you must remember for that specific step.

  • Creating a sense of urgency
  • The guiding coalition
  • Vision and strategy
  • Communicating the change vision
  • Empower your employees on a broad basis
  • Generate quick wins
  • Consolidate gains and initiate further change
  • Anchor new approaches into the corporate culture

Conclusion: If you are responsible to lead a transition to become more agile this book is a must read.

To order: The Scrum Culture – Introducing Agile Methods in Organizations

Portfolio Canvas

In one of my previous posts I discussed the Portfolio Canvas. I received several questions from my readers, triggered by the picture of the Portfolio Canvas, that they would like to see the post in English. I asked the developers if they were willing to create an English version. I just received the first draft.

The remainder of this post is the translation of the Dutch post: Portfolio Canvas.

I was triggered by a sneak preview of this portfolio Canvas during a seminar about business agility with an agile portfolio (28 June 2017). I thought this canvas was an answer for agile portfolio management, but now it is formally released, I have to conclude it’s not completely true.

In this post, I will briefly summarize this portfolio Canvas and I give my vision and some recommendations. Feel free to give feedback too.

Michael Sauerbier, Diederik Biesboer, Daniel van den Dries & John van Rouwendaal (all from Cratos Consulting) are the developers of the Portfolio Canvas®.

Portfolio Canvas ENOn their website ( http://cratosconsulting.nl/het-portfolio-canvas/, in Dutch only) we get the following summary:

The Portfolio Canvas is a tool for portfolio managers and (senior) management to:

  • Create a project portfolio overview and
  • To facilitate the priority discussion

The Portfolio Canvas supports organizations in answering the following questions:

  • Who, why, when, and which projects and programs
  • What are the overall portfolio cost (Euro) and benefits (revenues)
  • Biggest portfolio risks and dependencies

The Portfolio Canvas delivers added value in the development and monitoring of a project portfolio by:

  • Facilitating the creation of the project portfolio
  • Delivering a simple overview of the agreed portfolio
  • Communicating the agreed portfolio
  • Facilitates progress monitoring and control.

Remarks and recommendations:

  • Good initiative, which can become, in co-creation, a valuable add for organizations.
  • Replace revenues with benefits or value (financial & non-financial) and work force with people.
  • Nice layout. For me unclear why the arrow and the circle in the center is counter clockwise.
  • I have my doubts if the portfolio canvas offers enough information to control the portfolio progress (maybe by adding post-its on projects in the ‘DOING’-area with impediments (e.g. end date not feasible).
  • I would suggest extending the portfolio canvas with a timeline at the bottom with milestones (changes, benefits). And make the picture clockwise to show movement of the portfolio (and remove or shorten the rectangular extension)
  • The developers explain that the portfolio canvas is based, among other things, on Kanban (Lean). I would like to emphasize this by adding a WIP-limit in the ‘DOING’-area (as an answer to a common anti-pattern of too many parallel in-flight projects).
  • Best practices like Management of Portfolios (AXELOS) or the Standard for Portfolio Management (PMI) suggest dividing the portfolio into different buckets or categories and prioritize the initiatives within these buckets or categories.
  • This could be facilitated by giving each strategic objective its own color and use post-its with the same color for the corresponding projects and programs.

Looking forward to your remarks and recommendations.