Tag Archives: QRC

Book review: The Agility Shift

9781629560700-480x600Pamela Meyer is the author of the book ‘The Agility Shift. Create Agile and Effective Leaders, Teams, and Organizations’. Not a book about an agile framework but a guide to help organisations and their leaders and employees to make a shift to the right in terms of Bob Marshall’s right shifting model to become more effective, to become more agile!

The book is divided in three parts. Part one covers the understanding and dynamics of the agility shift by explaining what and why, by weaving the relation web for agility and discovering the five dynamics of the agility shift. Part two explains what it means to make the agility shift at all levels of the system. Talking about the agile leader, the agile team and the agile organisation. Part three focusses on putting agility into work. How can you shift to agile learning and development and recruiting, reinforcing, recognizing and retaining your agile talent?

Agility shift can be summarized by the three C’s: Agility Competence, Agility Capacity and Agility Confidence and is first and foremost a shift in mind-set. A shift from the false comfort of “a plan” to achieving a state of readiness to find the opportunity in the unexpected. To build this readiness you can make use of your own Relational Web.

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To download the QRC The Relational Web: The agility shift web

Becoming an agile leader asks for a leadership mind-set for agility, whole-person agility and learning agility. To build a team make use of lessons from improvement, high-stake and development teams: work with the same understanding of the givens, agree to the givens, practice gift giving, practice finding the game, provide opportunities for interaction, make communication and coordination expectations explicit, expect role elasticity and learning agility, develop resource awareness, practice rapid prototyping: fail faster, learn quicker, work at a sustainable pace and capacity, create an agile manifesto for your team.

When agile leadership and the first teams are in place you can start co-creating the agile organisation by weaving the organisational relational web (create groups that foster employee camaraderie, maximize your relational web potential, and improve the proximity between members of your relational web), Structuring for the agility shift (create opportunities to identify the bare spots, get input on barriers and enablers, and resist the urge to formalize) and las but not least expand engagement to build capacity for decision making (empowerment) and converge planning and action to maximize your organizational agility.

The last part explains what the shift means for agile learning and development and recruiting, reinforcing, recognizing, and retaining your agile talent. You get an overview of competencies, skills and practices and performance indicators as well as a helping aid for recruiting for agility with sample conversation topics/scenarios and questions and tips to listen and look for specific performance indicators.

Conclusion: No matter what agile framework you are using, this book will bring you above the level of framework techniques and gives you helpful insights to become more agile. A must read for agile leads!

To buy: The Agility Shift

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Lean happy family game

leankwartetI received a ‘Happy family game’ regarding Lean offered by Symbol Business Improvement.

Several topics can be collected like Lean Thinking, Change Management, Lean Methods & Tools, Process Flows, Waste/Muda, and many more.

You can use this game for fun, to fresh up your memory and see if you understand the mentioned topics or as a simple Lean Quick Reference Card. Each card has a nice colorful pictogram or chart and corresponding explanation. See attached picture representing the topic Lean Thinking with the four cards: Flow, Pull, Lowering the water level and First time right.

At this moment, you see several scaling agile frameworks talking about the lean-agile mindset and embracing the Lean Start-up approach from Eric Ries. Here you will have a potential conflict when Lean Start-up talks about ‘Fail fast’ and Lean Thinking mentions ‘First time right’. So, it’s good to explain what we mean with ‘Fail fast‘ to avoid confusion.

book review: De project(ver)leider / SPOMP

 

projectverleiderspompJust read the “De project(ver)leider. Hoe je tijdens je project draagvlak creëert en met stakeholders verandering succesvol implementeert” from Leon Hielkema and Ankie Swakhoven. It’s based on the American version “Strategic project management SPOMP. Five powerful strategies to seduce and influence stakeholders” from Leon Hielkema.

The most important success factors of project success are related to support from clients, internal users.

In this book you get five strategies that are very powerful in creating commitment for your project. If you combine these five strategies you have the possibility to ‘seduce’ your stakeholders into your change and to support you to be successful in achieving the project objectives.

SPOMP:
S: Select your stakeholders
P: Plan to communicate
O: Organize influence
M: Market your change initiative
P: Prove potential success

The book is divided in eight chapters. The key parts of the book are the five chapters describing the five strategies and the other smaller chapters are focussing on the benefits of SPOMP and making a career. Every chapter contains several examples.

I summarized the five strategies in a handy one-pager.

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Conclusion. Stakeholder management is explained in several methods like PMBoK, PRINCE2, MSP etc., but with this, easy to read book you can find a lot of pragmatic advice to bring stakeholder management into practice. It complements the method you are using! The book is definitely worthwhile buying.

You can find more information on:
www.deprojectverleider.nl
www.seducestakeholders.com

Aanschaffen: De project(ver)leider

To buy: Strategic project management SPOMP

PRINCE2 in pictures: The TAG-PM PRINCE2 Trigger MAP

Dia1It’s already a while ago that I used the tag PRINCE2 in pictures. I received a nice overview of PRINCE2 containing all triggers to and from all the processes. It’s called the TAG-PM PRINCE2 Trigger Map from Trans Atlantic Group (TAG). Besides the graph you will also get an explanation of the flow within and between the processes. You will also see where most of the Management Products are created or used.

To download: PRINCE2 Trigger Map EN Poster v010212

For those who are studying for their PRINCE2 exam this is a nice and simple aid to support their study.

In a next version I would suggest a few small adjustments:

  • Add some missing Management Products: Issue Report (from CS4 Capture and Examine Issues and Risks to CS5 Review Stage Status), include Project Product Description and Business Case as part of PB and PID and add Product Descriptions to the different plans. Lessons Report could be added to the End Stage/Project Report. If you add Management Strategies to the PID you are complete.
  • I would also give a try to eliminate those process activities, which are mentioned more than once. E.g. DP5 is showed 3 times, but I could also see that it helps to understand the flow. You could add End Stage Report to the output of white box SB.
  • Divide SU in two steps. One step to create the Project Brief and another step to create the Initiation Stage Plan. If there is no viable outline Business Case it doesn’t make sense to create the Initiation Stage Plan.
  • Because this is a trigger map I would suggest to add the formal PRINCE2 triggers/events to the map as well. E.g. the requests to, the notifications, the recommendations, etc.

But as stated definitely helpful if you are preparing yourself for the exam. If you already want to have complete pictures showing all management products and where the are created, used and/or updated, all events, processes but also the principles, themes and roles and responsibilities have a look at my handy PRINCE2 Quick Reference Card. See Prince2 2009 Edition Quick Reference Card

Lost in standards

Dia1In the last “projectie, edition 04-2014”, the bi-monthly magazine of ipma-nl, I published a Dutch article about the many methods and frameworks that are available in the field of portfolio, programme and project management. To download: Verdwaald in het standaardenbos IPMA Projectie magazine 04-2014 I created a sort of quick reference card with available standards and frameworks (It’s limited, there are many more). To download: standards-qrc-170129-v1-9

In the middle of the quick reference card you find a generic model with portfolio, programme and project management as horizontal boxes. Behind these boxes you will find vertical boxes with PMO, IT, benefits management, value management and risk management to support project, programme and portfolio management. And as the background I used two triangles representing the people and maturity of project, programme and portfolio management. From this model I made connections with several well-known organizations that develop and own standards. E.g. Axelos as the owner of PRINCE2, MSP, MoP, MoV, MoR, P3M3 and ITIL or PMI as the owner of PMBoK, The standard for Portfolio Management, The standard for Programme Management, OPM3, etc. You will also find AMPG, APM, IPMA and several suppliers of Agile/Scrum as well as some ISO models. dia1 In the Dutch article, I focus on the usage of these standards. It’s not that simple that you only have to select a project management method. Je must be aware that it will not be possible to implement all your ideas and ambitions. You have to select the right initiatives. This will ask for a portfolio management method. To realize your strategic objectives, you need more than only projects. You will run programmes too, asking for a programme management method. Besides temporary project and programme offices you probably need a permanent portfolio office as well as a centre of excellence to communicate, support and train staff to use these standards and best practices.

At a certain moment you want to know were you are from a maturity view, in comparison with others, and based on your own ambition you would like to know the gap you have to bridge. It will be beneficial for an organization if all these models or frameworks are connected to each other. As a rule of thumb, I would advice an organization to choose for either Axelos or PMI as the starting point and combine your choice with the competence baseline from IPMA. If you choose e.g. for PRINCE2, it makes sense to choose for MSP and MoP for your programme and portfolio management. For maturity scans you look at P3M3 because that’s in line with these standards. Your temporary and permanent PMO will be supported by P3O, etc. For supplementary techniques you could make use of the PMBoK from PMI.

Or, when you started with the PMI family, it makes sense to combine this with the project or programme board approaches from PRINCE2 and MSP and the usage of business cases as described in PRINCE2 9789401800068_CoverLR-541x850I am one of the authors of the book Global standards and publications, edition 2014/2015, Van Haren Publishing. You can download a free copy of this book. http://www.vanharen.net/file/PDF/9789401800068.pdf Please let me know if you are aware of new standards that are worthwhile to mention in this QRC.

for a comparison between PRINCE2 and PMBoK see the overview from KnowledgeTrain: Comparison PRINCE2/PMBoK

Update:

  • 17/01/29: Added PM2 Project Management Methodology from The European Commission
  • 17/01/29: Added Scrum @ Scale from Srcuminc.com
  • 16/01/23: Added Nexus (Scaled Professional Scrum) from Scrum.org
  • 15/10/04: IPMA ICB3 replaced with ICB4
  • 15/07/07: Added new Axelos framework PRINCE2 Agile
  • 15/05/27: Added Change mgt vertical + CMBoK (Change Management body of Knowledge) + CHAMPS2
  • 15/04/24: Added ISO 21500 project, 21503 programme, 21504 portfolio, 21505 Governance, 21506 Vocabulary
  • 15/02/24: Added CCPM (Goldratt), CMMi, Global Alliance for Project Performance Standards (GAPPS)
  • 14/10/21: Added Exin Agile Scrum from EXIN
  • 14/09/29: Added Agile Programme Management (Agile PgM) from APMG
  • 14/09/29: Added PRiSM™ (Projects integrating Sustainable Methods) from GPM
  • 14/09/29: Added Portfolio, Program & Project Sustainability Model (PSM3) from GPM

MoP; The strategic and organizational context at a glance

Dia1MoP can be divided into four integrated elements: The strategic and organizational context, Principles, Portfolio Definition Cycle, and Portfolio Delivery Cycle.

Before you go into the details of the portfolio definition and portfolio delivery cycles you must understand how portfolio management links to the following six key functionalities or activities: strategic/business planning, business as usual, budgeting and resource allocation, project and program management, performance management and corporate governance.

The official MoP book addresses the relationship between portfolio management and each key functionality or activity individually.

To help my students in MoP training classes to understand these relationships, I brought these six together. As a result it’s easier to understand why these relationships exists.

Dia1If you look at the figure, you start at the top. Strategic/business planning drives on one hand business as usual (Run the business) and sets the basis for the scope of the portfolio (change the business). To make sure everybody will do what is needed to achieve the objectives you need to have performance management in place. KPI’s to support business as usual as well as KPI’s to support the change initiatives. Missing KPI’s will definitely result in failure or problems. Programme and project management are mechanisms to deliver the changes. Portfolio management will deliver the standards, processes, and staff development (Centre of Excellence) and the management of dependencies and overall risk management for the programme and project management function. Budgeting and resource allocation (money, people, equipment, facilities, etc.) will help you to control and to build a portfolio that is manageable and realistic to deliver and to keep the shop open. The results from programme and project management will lead to an adjusted business as usual organization and running the adjusted business organization will result in the realization of forecasted benefits. Behind all these functions you will find corporate governance. The ongoing activity of internal control and portfolio management supports this control by linking the strategy with the portfolio, providing a framework to deliver the portfolio, and creating clarity on roles and responsibilities and progress against plan.

Besides these six key functionalities or activities portfolio management can/will/need to collaborate with other functionalities e.g. communications, IT, finance, procurement, HR, etc.

To download the figure: MoP (Org context, 140711) v1.0

P3O roles QRC

During my last training several candidates talked about project support (or project office) in terms of administrative and secretarial support. Of course this one of the tasks to fulfill but there are much more roles which could be positioned within the office.

Within the Project, program me and portfolio offices you can find generic & management roles and functional roles. In attached overview these roles are positioned in the different (temporary) offices or groups. To download: QRC (P3O roles, 140522) v1.1

Management Roles:

  • P3O sponsor
  • Head of Programme or Project Office (Temporary office)

Generic roles:

  • Portfolio Analyst
  • Programme or Project Specialist
  • Programme or Project Officer

Functional roles:

  • Benefits and value role
  • Commercial role
  • Communication and Stakeholder Engagement role
  • Information Management role
  • Consultancy and Performance Management role
  • Finance role
  • Issue role
  • Change Control role
  • Planning role
  • Quality Assurance role
  • Resource Management role
  • Risk role
  • Reporting role
  • Secretariat/Administrator role
  • Tools Expert role

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